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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
to an integrated mode of transportation that is good for our environment and community. so in closings thank you to everyone in our efforts and it's been eagerly awaited. i've been in the senate and the assembly n for 15 years so i've eagerly awaited this day. rest assured i'll continue to be an advocate in congress even in this is this tough environment for transportation infrastructure. i wish you the best of lick and a very happy labor day. thank you. again (clapping) >> knoll let me introduce our tremendous leader in the california state senate darryl stein beggar. >> good afternoon to leaders from the bay area. when i hear people talk about this bridge and today's events the touchstone that is most often talked about is 1989 the earthquake. and this is, of course, appropriate. but as steven said earlier the touchstone for this great california event could be just as easily been 1936 the year the bridge was build. for in 193 of this country was in the midst of the great depression. a signal to renewed civic effort proved that the pioneer spirit still lives. and now, of course, it the 2012
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
of time to continue to reduce crime and continue to create a safe environment and environment where we would not necessarily need to have this large investment in the criminal justice system. [ applause ] >> to mr. gas skon. if we were to eliminate money bail in effect turn over a decision whether or not someone is in custody to a judge whether or not they have been violator likely to reoffending or a flight risk, do you think that kind of system would likewise get accused of discrimination against the poor or racial minorities or do you think it would be more fair? >> i think it would be more fair. if you look at the fact that hispanics for instance are under the current system 4 percent more likely to be held on a pretrial setting than whites, 27 percent, we can show there is a disparity there. if we create a model that is based on evidence base risk factors that can be applied to the individual and the setting of that individual and can be done objectively not because an officer is making a decision but putting some kind of value system to those factors that are likely to impact r
care and in the environment for future generation. mayor ed lee began his career as a civil rights attorney he later served as a director of the human rights commission fighting for people then as director of the public works and later as city administrator now as mayor of san francisco he continues to fight by implementing services that help our most vulnerable community. i'd like to welcome to the stage the houshlg may have san francisco mayor ed lee. (clapping.) >> thank you very much. good evening, everybody and welcome to the people's palace. well, this is tonight i'm excited to be here it's an honor to be here to celebrate the ninth american heritage indian month no san francisco celebration of the awards. i wanted to thank not that all of you are here but for k q e d for the sponsoring of local heros. this is important because your city is all about diversity and i want to make sure that everybody can live here and be here and have good jobs and education and if they go out to the military they'll come back and give go opportunities for them. i have a special guest someone
the area for 1 hundred and 50 years we're planning you understand public health and our environment don't think that so come in down and see how everybody. >> all right. good morning. thank you all for coming out today i'm ed reiskin i'm the director of transportation in san francisco. i appreciate you all coming out. what we're here to talk about is safety. about a year and a half ago the board of supervisors adapted a strategic plan identifying transportation safety as the number one goal for the 6 years of the strategic plan and that will continue to be our goal. the safety of the transportation system is walking in the streets and driving a bus or riding a bike. i think the good news is that san francisco jefferson is a safe city and a muni is a safe transit agency. we're starting from a good place but there are some areas where there is work to be done. in the area of crime most types of crime are low and continue to decline on the transit system. there's a couple that are going if in the wrong direction. we're going to be talking about that today. the other piece of good news we h
them to two way. so we developed a one way and two-way option, both working through environment and the folsom street pilot project will provide a lot of critical data to inform the final concept. so the one-way offers a -- this is folsom -- a two-way cycle track. on the north side of the street. and the two-way and a transit-only lane during peak hours. and then the two-way has a separated cycle track on both sides. and again to do these things and widen sidewalks, it's the trade-off again, where we have to take parking or take a traffic lane and it's not to penalize anything, but to accommodate the different kind of trips that are there, but also the new land uses will be hopefully such that someone can walk and bike and take transit to home to the store to their job. so we're hoping that the length and nature of the trips will be different. as far as funding is concerned, to-date it's been accommodated or excuse me, funded by a few grants, and agreements or work orders between the two agencies. moving forward, and right now through environmental, again, a few grants, mt
into society, you still need that structured environment, you know, to regain your own empowered self and identify what's goin' on in your life and how you can move forward. it's really about trying to find what's going to work for you in that process of incarceration. so, you know, incarceration is something that touches a lot of people's lives. a lot of families have somebody that's incarcerated. absolutely. how did you determine that you wanted to become a peer support person? during my incarceration, i started taking some self-help groups. and once i started taking the self-help groups, you know, looking around at the room, i said, you know, i wanted to become one of the facilitators of the groups because i still needed some more time myself in the groups, also. so, i became a facilitator, and next thing i knew i was in a therapeutic community, also facilitating in the therapeutic community. and just being able to assist the counselors and the therapists during that process, i felt that was something that i wanted to do. it engaged you. once i was on the streets, yes. very good. m
been protecting the environment to mayor ed lee who is building the extension programs who has helped to there our focuses and effectiveness and strengthen our role 90 in government and the architect is being trormd. we should all take heart from their transformational change. we've shown we can continue our focus to our values we'll indeed have an impact on the federal government in the lives of the american people and hopefully on the world stage where america continues to lead. now we have a woman who needs little introduction nancy pelosi is the representative for the one hundred and 31st congress reforming the political system to create clean campaigns and concocting reforms and slurring the neighborhoods and scalds. from 2007 to 2011 she served in the house of representatives and she's represented congress for 25 years and a please welcome nancy pelosi (clapping) thank you very much ruth inform that wonderful introduction and recognition of the role that we all play and how connected we all are. and thank you for allocating the leadership of president obama his election helped u
soil conditions and then, on top of that, we have built environment. we have buildings built of all different kinds of construction types and dates. when you put those together. maybe you are sitting on rock areas that are built solidly that will have little impact and you have other buildings, soft story buildings and people have essentially the same expectation. >> and the building department would come knock on my door and tell me it wasn't safe >> there are very few retrofitted laws. you have to make brick buildings saver. >> you have to reduce the risk of life lost. >> so the brick building standard is a low standard. it was to prevent catastrophic collapse. the brick buildings, we have 1800 of them. most have been upgraded to prevent catastrophic deaths. it's the lowest possible >> and they might need to be torn john. by the way, this was lori johnson. this is our risk analysis and has done work to reconstruction especiallily in kobe and post katrina. >> thanks for joining us >> you are going to be coming to the caps meeting. >> i am on the advisory committee. >> most of san f
of a production, you know, platform that if we're smart in this post recession environment we'll won't go back to the economy we'll move forward. i'm bullish about this and this region is rich in small batch and boutique on up to advanced >> technology will have a role in all of that as well. if you see this company 3-d technology for example, willing regulation in his the way we looked engineering systems because you could see it. auto desk is growing rapidly in san francisco they just opened up another portion of their work on pier 9. we're all talking about advanced manufacturing >> no longer have the machines but the machines are operating with an ipad and your reading out precision cutting everybody from chocolates to clothing to manufactured products so extension is going to play a big thing in manufacturing. >> if you're joining us think on the radio we're talking about economic growth and we have ed lee mayor of san francisco and the bruce cats from the washington area. let's talk about enlightenment change and building green cities and a low carbon future away from fossil fultsdz f
better at creating an environment where we have more jobs and more economic development. i know that all of us are committed to ensuring that we have a budget that not only provides basic city services that we have come to expect but make sure that we take care of our most vulnerable. whether it be our at-risk use, our seniors, are disabled, our working families, folks who are out of work. i know something that every public servant who is here is committed to. adding with all come together as a board, as a city. we should come together as san franciscans, and, colleagues, at this time, i hope, and i asked that we unanimously vote for ed lee to be our next mayor. this is also a historic day for the asian-american community. for a community that has been here in santa francisco, for over 160 years, i am a product of that community. i know the ed and all of us of asian-american decent feel the legacy. i want to thank all of you who have been part of this historic moment to make this happen. and say that this is obviously not just about a chinese- american community or an asian american comm
will make the environment better. we had approximately 1,000 overflows occur in 1999. today, we've reduced overflows by 45% to 50%. and it's going to continue to improve as we go forward with the rehabilitation program that's required under the consent decree. narrator: an important piece of the program is the construction of an 8-mile-long storage tank that will significantly decrease combined sewer overflows. man: right now, we're at the bottom of the rockdale construction shaft. we're 310 feet below grade, deep under atlanta in hard rock. in the downtown area of atlanta, the sewer system and the stormwater system are combined and there are overflows during storm events, and so the purpose of this system is to relieve that flow, take it into the tunnel, transport it to a brand-new treatment plant, clean up the chattahoochee river. narrator: instead of the combined sewage overflowing into the river, it will flow into this tunnel that acts as a storage tank. the water will then slowly empty into the new plant for treatment before it's released back into the river. man: the system in total
from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the watershed. in developed areas, concrete an
the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro: the purpose of
. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart our economy, and there will be more work to be done. i would like to hand over the podium to nicole rivera, who put this together. she will introduce the panelists and go over some logistics. i want to point out quickly that we are being recorded by san francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans th
, pretty much like i said, from a state hospital institution to these small home-like environments. go ahead, michael. i'll just piggyback off that. that decreases hospitalization. absolutely. so, that decreases also cost, and that's what we want to see, you know, decrease of cost, as well as hospitalization. and if a person in the community knows i have a place of respice to go to, and i don't have to go behind a wall, you know, that's less anxiety and less being overwhelmed, that i can go into a place where i can feel warm and comfortable and have that, just, opportunity just to have like a safe haven. absolutely. and let's talk about the housing. i wanted to come back from the last panel to the whole issue of housing. how difficult is it to get housing for individuals that are leaving the justice system? oftentimes, i know for myself, the men and women that i engage, we are using the shelter system right now. they have to, you know, go through an intake process and get properly placed. you know, it depends on their actual offense. some of the facilities who house the homeless don't
and meanders under a canopy of oaks yup lipid u.s. and chill out in this pleasant and quiet environment and you might see butter nice, and dandelion and is squirrels hundred dollaring for their next meal and buena vista park is 88
>> we came to seven straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like l
and 50 years we're planning you understand public health and our environment don't think that so come in down and see how
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
, some indicators in environment, are you looking for any type of unattended packages or boxes in high risk areas, liquids, mist -- this is going to be a biological or chemical release. numerous sick or dead animals or birds. any objects that does not seem right, do you want to touch it? i'm not sure what this is, let me jostle it around. no, no, don't do that. move away and report it. remember that. a cell phone, a call, calling 911, using your cell phone may detonate that device. so obviously don't use your cell phone. go to a hard wire phone, land line phone, outside, and call 911. what do we do as first responders. when we come up do we use our walkie talkies or radio? no. you go to a hard wire phone, call it in and get the information back because it may detonate that using the radio frequency. remember we talked about suspected terrorism is a stop sign for you as nerts. you do not want to get hurt. any questions on the terrorism? bnice is not nice. incident takes place, it takes place here on the left side, this is called the hot zone. you obviously want to be in the cold zone. f
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)